Join me at AECT 2019 in Las Vegas!

The word, Inspired, is written against a purple splash of paint.
AECT 2019 Inspired Theme

Association for Educational Communications and Technology

The Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is a fantastic professional organization for instructional designers, instructional technologists, educational technology support staff, instructors, and education researchers. Why? Because they do fun stuff like ‘Breakfast with Champions’ and ‘Game Night’ besides all of the academic stuff.  I learned about it from my professors in my doctoral program who promoted AECT and their educational technology standards to their students. Their 2019 international convention will be held in Las Vegas, NV from October 21st-25th at the Convention Center. This year’s convention theme is Inspired Professional Learning. Inspired Learning Professionals. Let me know if you plan to attend so we can network and attend sessions and events together.

Sessions

I’m excited to share that the following three presentations were accepted! I’m really happy to be able to lead an Inspire! session, which is a new format to provide 50-minute professional development without the extra cost.  I invite you to attend my sessions below.

Host: Design and Development (D&D) Division

Magis Instructional Design Model for Transformative Teaching, Dr. Rogers

Wed, Oct 23, 10:00 to 10:20am, Convention Center, Pavilion 6 (Note: I’m first in this concurrent session.)

Description. The Magis Instructional Design Model endeavors to transform teaching online through the lens of critical pedagogy to place the human in a real-world context as much as possible through learning experiences and reflection. The goal being transformative learning experiences instead of transmissive ones that use the antiquated banking model of education. The model includes instructional strategies from the cognitive and affective domains. The Author asks for input and feedback on this model.

Host: D&D: Instructional Design in Context – Service

Roadmap to Reentry Resources in Mobile County to Prevent Recidivism Service Project, Dr. Rogers, Dr. Demetrius Semien, & Aubrey Whitten

Wed, Oct 23, 2:20 to 2:50pm, Convention Center, Ballroom C (Note: We go second in this session.)

Description. Would you like to start a service project? Consider creating a Google Map of service providers that meet a strong need in your community (food deserts, homeless shelters, or the previously incarcerated). Presenters will share their service project developing a reentry map of service providers to combat recidivism in their community. Learn to plot locations, draw pathways, and add information to a Google Map. Participants will also share what they are doing in their communities.

Host: Culture, Learning, and Technology (CLT) Inspire!

Safeguard Your Online Persona by Using Various Techniques and Technologies, Dr. Rogers

Oct 25, 9:00 to 9:50am, Convention Center, Conference Rm 1 (Note: Workshop format so bring your devices!)

Description. Have you googled yourself lately? What does the Internet search reveal about you? With each hashtag, blog post, tweet, and online project, you are building your online reputation whether you want to or not. In the absence of professional branding, your online persona brands you. Learn to curate your online personal data (e.g., Google Alert for keywords, GoCardigan to cleanse tweets, & reverse search images) and leave with an action plan.

Handouts

For AECT members, I’ll place my presentation and paper on the conference online portal. For my blog readers, I’ll post my presentations to SlideShare and then embed them here once their finalized. (Forthcoming!)

In closing, the sessions at AECT are really good. The organization’s special interest groups are dynamic. Conference-goers are very open to making new friends and learning, and this includes the big names in the field. You may find yourself sitting beside David Wiley, Curt Bonk, Lloyd Rieber, Amy Bradshaw, or George Veletsianos!

Breakfast table with invited guest and Wheaties box in the center
Breakfast with Champion, George Veletsianos

#aect19inspired

Curation of Your Online Persona Through Self-Care and Responsible Citizenship

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I’m excited to announce that I finalized my first chapter for the K-12 book titled, Leveraging Technology to Improve School Safety and Student Wellbeing (forthcoming). My contribution to the edited book is titled, Curation of Your Online Persona Through Self-Care and Responsible Citizenship. It is written for secondary teachers and their students. It started as a few lesson plans for an interdisciplinary course at Spring Hill College (IDS 394: Wired) and grew into blog posts and eventually this chapter. See my previous blog post on the Recipe for Digital Curation of Your Online Persona and the one about the Global Interdisciplinary College Course.

ABSTRACT

With each blog post, tweet, and online project, Internet users are building their online reputation whether they want to or not. In the absence of professional branding, users’ online presence contributes vastly to what brands them. Through critical digital pedagogy, teachers and students question all technology practices (e.g., self, school, society). This chapter addresses the safety, security, and perception of their online data through self-determined prevention, weeding, and branding based on their short- and long-term goals. Methods, resources, and a lesson plan are provided as guidance to support students’ well-being pertaining to the online dimensions of their academic and personal lives. Strategies discussed include online identity system checks to review current digital footprint and data vulnerabilities, contemplation of technology usage in terms of self-care and responsible citizenship, and curation and development of their online persona. These participatory practices address two of the ISTE Standards for Students regarding digital citizenship.


The book’s release date is October 2019. Preorders are available now at IGI Global. There are many interesting chapters on school safety from many different perspectives including the marginalized. If interested in purchasing, let me know and I’ll provide you with a 40% discount coupon code.

I’ll present some of the curation strategies mentioned in the book at the Association of Educational Communications and Technology’s annual conference held in Las Vegas, NV this fall. My session is hosted by the Culture, Learning, and Technology special interest group in a new free workshop-style Inspire session on Friday, October 25th at 9:00-9:50 in the Convention Center, Room 1. It’s titled, Safeguard Your Online Persona by Using Various Techniques and Technologies. I’ve learned so much from taking a deep dive into this topic to write this chapter and look forward to sharing it with you.

Reference

Rogers, S. (in press). Curation of your online persona through self-care and responsible citizenship: Participatory digital citizenship for secondary education. In S. P. Huffman, S. Loyless, S. Albritton, & C. Green (Eds.), Leveraging Technology to Improve School Safety and Student Wellbeing. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-1766-6


Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D.

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H5P: Free Software for Developing Interactive Learning Objects

I’ve been wanting to learn how to develop interactive content for course design but didn’t have the time, money, or opportunity to learn the sophisticated elearning authorware. This week, I found out that H5P is fairly easy to use and can be integrated within our Moodle learning management system (LMS). Plus, it’s an open educational resource provided for free. It uses HTML5 to create content that is displayed in existing publishing platforms.

I developed a drag-and-drop vocabulary activity to pair color-related Greek prefixes with medical terminology. This H5P learning activity is from the Question Set authoring template and includes multiple-choice, True/False, drag-and-drop, mark-the-words (select correct words from list), and fill-in-the-blank. See my first attempt authoring with H5P on their community site. It turned out larger than expected, so I need to figure out how to reduce it for smaller devices. You can download my vocabulary learning object for reuse on your website or LMS.

This is the first of many more H5P projects I’ll develop, so join the community or bookmark my account if interested. I thought H5P was fairly easy to learn.  Have you tried it yet? What have you made? Please share in the comments section.


Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D.

Teacherrogers Products
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Time-saving Tips for Teaching Online Part 1

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Commonly Used Software to Save Time

Teaching online courses is very time-consuming, especially if you have to build the course yourself.  Here are a  few tips to save time on various tasks. They include free or otherwise open education resources (OER) and premium software.

Assignments

Microsoft Word (premium software). Most educators know that MS Word provides the ability to give feedback on student papers through the Track Changes feature within its Review tool. However, most don’t realize that it also provides a way to automate common feedback through the AutoText tool.  To create your own automated personalized feedback, type word or abbreviation for common error and the corresponding corrective feedback and writing guidelines (i.e., APA or MLA) in a table. Then follow these steps:

  1. Highlight the text description.
  2. Select the Insert tab from the toolbar.
  3. Select Quick Parts in the Text section of the MS Office ribbon above.
  4. Then save the selection to Quick Part Gallery in Normal.dotm.
  5. Update name and description in the Gallery. If you make a mistake, edit the description provided by retracing your steps; it will ask if you want to redefine the Building Block entry when it detects similar content.

If the aforementioned directions don’t work for your version of Word, see their website. Not only will this save time grading, but it will help with consistency in feedback. I recommend providing the page number to the writing guidelines along with good examples as in Table 1. The more specific the better.

Table 1

Common Error with Corrective Feedback

doi Search for digital object identifiers (doi) at this site: www.crossref.org/simpletextquery. If you don’t find one for the article, provide the URL to its online location with the reference. See APA p. 49 for examples of references.

Google Classroom (free software). Google Docs also provides the option for corrective feedback on student writing. In this situation, you’ll need to be given access to the document and work within Google Drive or Google Classroom to use the tool. However, you’ll need to use Google Classroom to be able to save and reuse comments in their Comment Bank.

Content

Google Suite(free software). Google Suite of desktop publishing tools includes the following: Docs, Drawings, Slides, and Sheets. Because it’s cloud-based, after posting a link (or embedding them) in your online course or website, you can make updates from your Google Drive. This saves time when you encounter an error or need to make an update each term. You no longer need to remove it and upload a revised one as with MS Word or PDFs, which are static and based on your desktop.

Mobile Apps

To save time, install the mobile app for your learning management system (LMS) to readily access it on the go. This is helpful when you need to check something in the course that a student brings to your attention while you’re away from your computer. It’s also useful to see how responsive your course design is on a Mobile device.  Consider other mobile apps for commonly used ed tech tools for the online environment (e.g., Zoom for video conferencing, Google Drive for collaboration and storage, MS Word for publishing).

Quizzes

Respondus 4.0 (premium software) This is a Windows application that helps you upload your paper-based tests or surveys or that of your textbook publisher’s test bank to your online courses directly.  This will save you from having to create test questions one-by-one in the LMS if you already have it prepared. There’s only a little advance formatting of your paper-based test for it to be rendered by Respondus. See their website for tutorials.  Ask your instructional technologist to see if it’s available at your school. [Note: Respondus also makes test integrity software which is something altogether different.]

Blackboard Test Generator (OER). This software converts your electronic file tests (i.e., MS Word or Text) into LMS test questions. It’s hosted on this website where you copy-and-paste your test to convert it into a bbquiz zip file that can then be uploaded into your LMS when you create a new quiz. The directions on this website are fairly straightforward. After you convert the text, you’ll obtain a bbquiz zip file. This works much the same as Respondus. The limitation to this free software is that it doesn’t convert images; you’d need to add those afterward within the LMS. For a more robust conversion, see Respondus 4.0 above.


What are your time-saving tips? Please share those in the comment section! I’ll be updating this as I remember short-cuts in building and running online courses. Part II will cover some non-software tips such as Ctrl+Z to undo mistakes on the web or LMS platform when there is no undo button.

Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D.

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A Rubric to Identify Online Course Plans for a Community of Inquiry

This blog was originally posted on the AACE Review (Rogers, 2018).

Community of Inquiry

A community of inquiry (COI) is what it sounds like—people gather to learn from each other. I argue that a COI can be preplanned to engender a robust learning environment. What that entails is under investigation. For instance, a query of COI educational research on the EdTechLib database garnered 6500 articles. “The ‘community’ in “community of inquiry” is not defined by time or space. A common question, problem, or interest helps to forge the connection” (Shields, 1999, para. 2).

Historically, interdisciplinary scholarly communities have been around since the time of Theagenes of Rhegium who orally interpreted texts to pupils in the 6th century B.C.E. (Hornblower & Spawforth, 1998). Those ancient Greek gatherings were generally teacher-centered in a unidirectional flow of information between the teacher and listening participants until eventually taking on the Socratic method of shaping pupils’ understanding through questioning for critical thinking in the 3rd century B.C.E.

As for the American educational setting, the foundations of a COI can be found in John Dewey’s writing and reform efforts, which were influenced by Charles Sanders Pierce’s logic of inquiry for scientific methods and Jane Addams’ pragmatic approach to social analysis (Shields, 1999). For example, Dewey strongly believed that through experience-based learning, students could intellectually address the subject matter with the assistance of their teachers (Dewey, 1938).

Fast forward to computer-mediated instruction, Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000) proposed a COI framework for distance education. It includes the following elements they deem essential: social presence (SP), cognitive presence (CP), and teaching presence (TP). According to Google Scholar, their COI framework has been cited academically 4817 times. Based on their research and related literature, my interpretation of the COI presences is as follows:

  • SP is the co-construction of meaning through shared learning experiences to engender student agency from connectedness.
  • CP is the engagement in learning activities that demand higher-order thinking skills.
  • TP refers to feedback and instruction and can be presented through the instructor or student-led activities.

Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric ©

The online course syllabus serves as a plan of action that can be utilized for discussing continuous improvement between course design collaborators (i.e., instructional designers, course developers, instructors). To that end, I developed a rubric to evaluate online instructors’ planned interactions for delivering computer-mediated instruction based on their syllabi. It is used to analyze proposed interaction treatments (ITs) such as student-student opportunities for discussion, not the actual course. Our purpose was to determine the inclusion and strength of ITs to provide instructional design (ID) feedback to online instructors regarding their course plans. The underlying theoretical premise being the more interactive the course, the higher the level of student satisfaction and course achievement. Cummins, Bonk, and Jacobs (2002) conducted a similar syllabi study that looked at formats and levels of communication of online courses from colleges of education.

The rubric’s purpose is to provide a pragmatic solution to prevent problematic teacher-led (passive knowledge) online courses with little student interaction nor rigorous academic challenges. The Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric© is based on general concepts from Garrison, Anderson, and Archer’s (2000) COI framework, quality distance education rubrics (California State University-Chico, 2009; Johnson, 2007; Quality Matters™, 2014; & Roblyer & Wiencke, 2004), and significant literature. It consists of the following categories: ID for CP, technology tools for COI, COI loop for SP, support for learner characteristics, and instruction and feedback for TP. The 5-point rubric has the following scale for the criteria: low, basic, moderate, above average, and exemplary. Points awarded determine the course’s potential level of engendering an online COI (i.e., low, moderate, or high). See rubric.

Content Analysis Research of Online Course Syllabi

Rogers and Van Haneghan (2016) conducted the initial research utilizing the rubric with two raters. Good interrater-reliability agreement was obtained in the review of 23 undergraduate and graduate education online course syllabi, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = .754, p < .001 and 95% CI [.514, .892]. Results indicated the potential for above-average CP (M = 4.7); however, SP (M = 3.1) was moderate, and TP (M = 2.7) was basic. Rogers and Khoury (2018) replicated the study at a different institution across disciplines with 31 syllabi; those findings mirrored the previous study’s levels of COI presences indicating a weakness in TP. For action research, the rubric criteria and results can serve as talking points between instructional designers and course developers to address gaps. Table 1 provides common ID feedback based on our 2018 syllabi analysis.

Table 1

Common Feedback Based on the Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric Analysis

Rubric Category Instructional Design Recommendations
Instructional Design for Cognitive Presence Include higher order thinking activities such as case analysis, papers that require synthesis or evaluation of peer, self, and/or product. See the list of cognitive activities in the Online Course Design Guide in Table 3.
Education Technology for COI · Add group work for collaborating on projects with Google Hangouts or Skype, so students can learn from each other.

· Use Schoology’s Media Album for students to share their projects and obtain peer feedback. For example, students could narrate PowerPoint project and save as MP4 to create a video presentation to add to a digital portfolio.

COI Loop for Social Presence · Provide a rubric for discussions to make the criteria clear.

· Provide discussions on readings to enhance learning from each other.

Support for Learner Characteristics

 

· Add the College’s accommodation statement.

· Provide links to academic tutoring services.

· Provide strategies for remediation and/or resources for building background knowledge.

Instruction and Feedback for Teaching Presence · Add specific online virtual office hours and format options. For example, use Skype, Google Hangouts, or FaceTime with your smartphone for human interaction.

· Describe direct instruction. Will there be narrated PowerPoints, audio summaries, lecture notes, or commercial program?

· Add information on feedback response time and format.

References

Cummings, J. A., Bonk, C. J., & Jacobs, F. (2002). Twenty-first century college syllabi: Options for online communication and interactivity. Internet & Higher Education, 5(1), 1.

Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. The Kappa Delta Pi Lecture Series. New York, NY: Collier Books.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education 2(2-3), 87-105. doi:10.1016/s1096-7516(00)00016-6

Hornblower, S., & Spawforth, A. (1998). The Oxford companion to classical civilization. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Johnson, E. S. (2007). Promoting learner-learner interactions through ecological assessments of the online environment. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 3(2). Retrieved from http://jolt.merlot.org/vol3no2/johnson.htm

QM Higher Education Rubric Fifth Edition. (2014). Quality Matters. Retrieved from https://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Roblyer, M., & Wiencke, W. (2004). Exploring the interaction equation: Validating a rubric to assess and encourage interaction in distance courses. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 8(4).

Rogers, S., & Khoury, S. (2018, October). Rubric to evaluate online course syllabi plans for engendering a community of inquiry: Round II. Paper presented at the meeting of the Association of Educational Technology & Communications, Kansas City, MO.

Rogers, S., & Van Haneghan, J. (2016). Rubric to evaluate online course syllabi plans for engendering a community of inquiry. Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, 349-357. Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Rubric for Online Instruction. (2009). Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. California State University-Chico. Retrieved from http://www.csuchico.edu/tlp/resources/rubric/rubric.pdf

Shields, P. M. (1999). The community of inquiry: Insights for public administration from Jane Addams, John Dewy and Charles S. Pierce. Archives of the Digital Collections at Texas State University. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/bitstream/handle/10877/3979/fulltext.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y


Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D

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What’s Grit Got to Do with Learning?

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What’s Grit Got to Do with Learning? was previously posted on the AACE Review (Rogers, 2017)

Grit

In terms of education, ‘grit’ is a combination of your passion for learning, perseverance at task, and purposeful activities. Volition and conation are synonyms for grit. During his AECT 2017 keynote, Thomas Reeves, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia and AACE Fellow since 2003 tackled the topic of grit. He stated that the conative domain is the missing piece for learning and placed it beside the affective and cognitive domains as the triad for intelligence, as was the case in Aristotle’s day.

Reeves and other scholars point out that grit/conation is not new to education. He referenced Snow’s (1992) Academic Aptitude Model, Carroll’s (1993) model of school learning that included perseverance, and Kolbe’s (2002) work on the conative domain (motivational-volitional). Looking at the literature, many prominent psychologists, past and current, recognize non-intellectual factors in learning performance.

Grit Research

Grit is important because it can boost life-long academic achievement (Abuhassàn & Bates, 2016). Here’s how other scholars describe it: industrious, conscientiousness, personality trait (Roberts, Lujeuz, Krueger, Richards, & Hill, 2014), passion, and perseverance (Duckworth, Peterson, Matthews, & Kelly, 2007). Critics of Duckworth et al.’s take on grit as a trait for success question the validity of their study’s findings (i.e., generalizability, confounding variables) and wonder whether participants who quit a grueling West Point Cadet initiation program also used grit to do so (Denby, 2016).

Duckworth and Reeves both mention Dweck’s (2009) theory on the growth mindset, as a way to help students develop grit. If you want to delve deeper into Grit, also take a look at Deci and Ryan’s (2009) self-determination theory since it addresses one’s ability to complete a task through willingness, volition, and endorsement of an activity.

The important message for learners is that grit is not solely about your ability/potential/talent per se. Grit is up to you!

Grit and Me

As a first-generation college graduate raised in situational poverty by a single parent, my perseverance has paid off. My grit is based on my openness to experience and conscientiousness, which you might recognize from the Big Five Personality Traits. I recently experienced grit during a gaming workshop, where I couldn’t hear the presenter or see the presentation clearly and my computer was running slow, but I persevered and learned the lesson. For me, it’s that point where I’m embarrassed by my ineptitude and faced with the fight-or-flight feeling. For my grit to kick in, it needs to be a challenging and purposeful activity.

Do you have grit? Take Duckworth’s Grit Scale to find out.

References

Abuhassàn, A., & Bates, T. C. (2015). Grit: Distinguishing effortful persistence from conscientiousness. Journal of Individual Differences, 36(4), 205-214. doi:10.1027/1614-0001/a000175

Deci, E. & Ryan, R. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist, 55(1), 68-78. doi:10.1037110003-066X.55.1.68

Denby, D. (2016, June). The limits of grit. Retrieved from https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-limits-of-grit

Duckworth, A. L., Peterson, C., Matthews, M. D., & Kelly, D. R. (2007). Grit: Perseverance and passion for long-term goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 9(6), 1087-1101. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.92.6.1087

Dweck, C. (2009). Developing Growth Mindsets: How Praise Can Harm, and How to Use It Well. [Presentation]. Paper presented at the Scottish Learning Festival, Glasgow. Retrieved from http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/video/c/video_tcm4565678.asp

Kolbe, K. (2002). The conative connection: Uncovering the link between who you are and how you perform. New South Wales: Pow Wow Events International.

Roberts, B. W., Lejuez, C., Krueger, R. F., Richards, J. M., & Hill, P. L. (2014). What is conscientiousness and how can it be assessed? Developmental Psychology, 50(5), 1315-1330.

Snow, R. E. (1992). Aptitude theory: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Educational Psychologist, 27, 5-32.


Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D

Teacherrogers Products
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My Courses Available on Schoology’s Public Resources

In my departure from a College that uses Schoology, I thought of ways that I might be able to save my online course designs for future use even though my new workplace doesn’t use this learning management system (LMS).  Fortunately, I was able to save the entire course files, not just the individual material.

First, I saved them to my Schoology personal Resources (aka Home), then I downloaded the courses as Common Cartridge (IMACC or Zip) files for future use. The Instructional Mangement System (IMS) Global Learning Consortium states that Common Cartridge is a formatting standard for the interoperability of content within other systems. See their Brief Primer on Common Cartridge Conformance. In Schoology, you can upload and export these types of course files. See the Schoology Help Center on this topic.

I also decided to share them on Schoology’s Public Resources so others can use them. To be clear, I’m only sharing the content that I created. See Figure 1 for the location of these free resources. Schoology doesn’t make it easy to locate by name, so you’ll need to filter the results by Resource Type (higher ed) and File Format (folder), etc.

Screenshot of the Schoology interface displaying the Public Resources icon on the left-hand side. The icon has a bookshelf with a globe beside it.
Figure 1. Schoology’s Public Resources

Anyone can sign up for an individual Schoology account to access them if their institution does not subscribe to this LMS. Here are the two courses that I shared:

  • Accessibility Workshop for Online Learning in Distance Education – I used this for faculty professional development for meeting accessibility federal guidelines in course design.
  • Critical Reading 101 Demo Hybrid Course – I used this for an actual developmental reading course for college students and as a demonstration course for faculty training purposes.

Schoology users can share their courses and other content on its Public Resources by selecting the bookshelf with globe icon beside the material in your personal resources. See Figure 2 for location. If you use either of my course content, I would love to hear about it!

Screenshot of Schoology user's Personal Resources with pop-up comment beside Public Resources icon indicating to share if selected.
Figure 2. Schoology’s Public Resources sharing tool

Continue reading “My Courses Available on Schoology’s Public Resources”