Join me at the Midsouth Educational Research Association conference in Pensacola!

Photo of Sandra Annette Rogers
Find me at the conference and say hello!

The Midsouth Educational Research Association (MSERA) will be hosting their annual meeting in Pensacola on November 6-8th, 2013. I’ll be speaking about my research on gaming as an instructional strategy for young children and effective online communication for higher education. In addition, I will present a poster session on TESOL’s Electronic Village Online (EVO) to share how my other professional organization trains English language teachers worldwide for free through a volunteer network and online collaborative processes.

Here’s the conference program. This is a relatively inexpensive conference in comparison to the national ones. For example, nonmember rates are $150 for professionals and $90 for students the day of the event. Of course it’s best to become a member (or to preregister).

Here is my schedule of presentations and poster sessions: ( Note: The links will take you to my PowerPoints on SlideShare.)

Sincerely,

Sandra Rogers

P.S. I posted all of my conference handouts and photos on padlet: http://padlet.com/wall/teacherrogers

TeachersPayTeachers: Halloween Literacy Gaming Activity

Girl dressed for Halloween going trick-or-treating
Happy Halloween!

I just uploaded a new product that incorporates gaming as an instructional strategy. I used Halloween vocabulary and images to capture young children’s interest. Students can practice syllabification, reading, storytelling, and vocabulary when playing these games! This product contains directions and material for four different types of games to use during literacy centers: clapping out the syllables, vocabulary battle game, vocabulary flashcards, and storytelling. Each game would last 30 minutes, which is about the same amount of time segment in group rotation in a 2-hour literacy block.

This product includes the following items:

  • a game scorecard;
  • a paper candy reward system;
  • directions;
  • 24 different game cards with the vocabulary word, image, and the number of syllables, and
  • 24 vocabulary cards without the name or syllable count for testing purposes.

Vocabulary includes basic words like bat and hat, as well as multisyllabic ones like Halloween and October. I suggest printing the vocabulary on card stock and laminating them prior to use. I think students are really going to enjoy these activities. Hopefully, they will want to play them multiple times to become very familiar with the content vocabulary. I also suggest having the students create their own games and corresponding rules.

Here’s a sample game:

#2A: Vocabulary Battle Game: The objective of the game is to correctly read the word for each card drawn.

Learning Objective: Students will practice reading words correctly.

Game Rules: This game can be played with 2-4 players.

Step 1: Place vocabulary cards face down in a stack.

Step 2: Player 1 takes a card and tries to read it. Then he shows it to the other players to get feedback (correct or incorrect). If the student reads it correctly, then they keep the card. If not, then the card is placed in the “trash” pile to be reused.

Step 3: Player 2 repeats this action.

Step 4: After all the face down cards have been read, shuffle the deck of discarded cards to continue the game. The player with the most cards wins. Students redeem cards for candy or other reward at the end of the game.

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Visit my store on TeachersPayTeachers to purchase this product! I plan to do the same gaming products based on content vocabulary for each holiday.

Sandra Rogers

Teachers’ Perspectives on Gaming as an Instructional Strategy for Children

Icon of game consul
How do you feel about gaming as an instructional strategy?

I’m interested in researching well-designed educational gaming for use in the elementary classroom, particularly computer-assisted language learning. The reason being is that elementary education and second language acquisition are my areas of expertise.  I hope to incorporate gaming theory and design into my knowledge base as an instructional designer. There is so much potential for optimizing learning in the elementary classroom with the use of well-designed educational games.

I acknowledge the difficulty of conducting research in the classroom, so I would focus on the phenomenology (qualitative research) of elementary teachers reflections on gaming as an instructional strategy. One of my professors mentioned the idea of getting feedback from primary school teachers enrolled in the various education programs at the university. I plan to use the mixed methods approach. I found literature on the correlation of Gagne’s (1985) nine events of instruction and gaming as an instructional strategy (Becker, 2008).

Currently, research on the effectiveness of educational gaming with children is scarce (Thai, Lowenstein, Ching, & Rejeski, 2009). Nonetheless, there are some great literature reviews like the one completed by The Joan Ganz Gooney Center at Sesame Workshop (Thai et al., 2009). Also, Reiber, Barbour, Thomas, and Rauscher (2008) found no statistical significance in their literature review comparing gaming and traditional learning; however, they stated that this is par for the course with any new educational technology compared with traditional learning.

For now, I’m conducting literature reviews on gaming as an instructional strategy with young children.

Becker, K. (2008). Video game pedagogy: Good games = Good pedagogy. In C. T. Miller (Ed.), Games: Purpose and potential in education (pp. 73-122). NY: Springer.

Gagné, R. M. (1985). The conditions of learning. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.

Reiber, L. P., Barbour, M.K, Thomas, G. B., & Rauscher, D. (2008) Learning by designing games: Homemade PowerPoint games. In C. T. Miller (Ed.), Games: Purpose and potential in education (pp 23-40). NY: Springer.

Thai, A. M., Lowenstein, D., Ching, D., & Rejeski, D. (2009). Game changer: Investing in children’s play to advance children’s learning and health. New York: The Joan Ganz Gooney Center at Sesame Workshop.

Read another literature review on gaming for second language learning: https://teacherrogers.wordpress.com/2013/11/27/gaming-as-an-instructional-strategy-for-language-learning/