Cool Tool | Kahoot!

I subscribe to this blog and thought this was something my readers would appreciate learning.

edtechdigest.com

CREDIT Kahoot!.pngKahoot!, the game-based learning platform, makes it easy to create, discover, play, and share fun learning games in minutes. Games can be found for any subject, in any language, and are accessible on any device. With Kahoot!, you can introduce new topics, test knowledge, revise, connect with others all over the world, survey opinions, gather insights, facilitate discussion, spark up professional development, or just have a little fun. The social, pedagogical games can be used in the classroom for formative assessments, to survey student opinions, and as rewards. Kahoot! will be launching its new mobile app, which it previewed at ISTE this year, in the fall. Teachers can use the app to send after-class challenges to students as homework, and learners can continue playing for revision and fun wherever they are. The game platform now hosts more than 50 million monthly active users and a public library of more…

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Thanks to all my followers!

Heart Tagxedo for blog post imageI wanted to celebrate the milestone of reaching 1000 followers on my blog! Thanks to all of you who subscribe to Teacherrogers’ blog on WordPress.  My first blog post was in 2010, but I didn’t really become active until 2011.  This will be post #139.  I also blogged for TESOL International Association during 2011-2012 on their website.  Additionally, I blogged for a workforce education nonprofit I spearheaded in 2007-2009.  Some of those blogs have been republished here.

As a subscriber or regular reader, you know that I strive to provide you with relevant information on instructional design, learning theories, integration of technology and social media into the learning environment, as well as specific information in my areas of interest (second language acquisition, gaming, and e-learning).  My blog posts also serve as an archive of my learning.  This provides me with a place to review and reflect.  I hope my blogs have provided you with the information you needed or, at the very least, an idea or link to follow up.

Thanks again for following me on this journey of social blogging!  Please join me in this celebration by leaving me a comment.

Gratefully,

Sandra Annette Rogers, MAT

Thanks and Happy New Year!

Cartoon headshot of blogger, Sandra Rogers

Dear Readers,

Thank you for all of your comments and re-sharing of my blog. I’m so humbled to have such a growing readership. I hope I have created some useful content for each of you. Let me know if you have a topic of interest that I might can blog about. I also renewed my Podbean podcast and hope to interview educators, instructional designers, game designers, and innovators on learning. Let me know if you’re interested!

Since my beginnings on this blog in 2011, I tried to make it practical. In 2015, I decided to transform my blog into a scholarly one as I near the end of my doctoral program of study. I’m slowly going back to previous posts to update them to include citations and more precise advice based on research.

In 2016, I will continue to blog at least once a week to share my learning with you. Blogging is my way of reviewing information to help me remember. It also helps me to synthesize information to share with the educators I work with now. Whenever I find myself explaining something verbally, I check to see if I have a blog on it to share as a follow-up. If I don’t, I write one. My blogs have become job aids!

This is the year that I start, and hopefully complete, my dissertation on gaming for second language acquisition. I will share more on this topic once I complete the proposal.

Happy New Year!

Sandra Annette Rogers

aka Teacherrogers

Thanks to my 700+ subscribers on WordPress!

Dear Readers,

I’m not sure when it happened, but my blog subscription increased from 100+ to 700+ readers! Thank you very much for your readership. My blog is my landing strip to all of my projects, so I take great care in keeping it up-to-date. It also reflects my learning curve, as I post my homework assignments from my doctoral studies in instructional design. It’s very encouraging to know that all my effort in sharing is actually being received.  To celebrate, I thought I’d share a festive machinima I filmed at a cast party in Second Life. I’m the cat avatar. Enjoy!

My Workshop Schedule

Photo taken by Sandra Rogers

I’d like to share my schedule of face-to-face workshops that I’ll be giving this school year. I work at the Innovation in Learning Center (ILC) at the University of South Alabama. They host ongoing professional development workshops for faculty and staff for online teaching.  I work for the ILC as a graduate research assistant. My work includes designing, developing, and delivering professional development to faculty to support student learning. If you live in the Mobile area and work at an institution of higher education, you are welcome to attend one of these workshops. Additionally, graduate students in instructional design and development at USA can attend, as long as they register in advance. There are many more listed at the ILC website.

My 2013-2014 Training Schedule at the ILC:

  •  Making Instructional Videos with Camtasia Relay:  Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama, 9/6/13
  • How to Make Your Online Course Accessible: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama​, 9/19/13
  • Sakai 101: Gradebook, Tests & Quizzes: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama​, 9/20/13
  • Sakai 101: Gradebook, Tests & Quizzes: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama​,​ 10/11/13
  • Making Instructional Videos with Camtasia Relay: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama, 10/23/13
  • Emergent Technologies: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama​, 10/30/13
  • Sakai 101: Gradebook, Tests & Quizzes: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama​, 12/3/13
  • Sakai 101: Communication Tools: Innovation in Learning Center, University of South Alabama​, 12/12/13
  • Sakai 101: Gradebook, Tests & Quizzes: Innovation in Learning Center (ILC), University of South Alabama (USA)​, 12/18/13
  • Making Instructional Videos with Camtasia Studio, ILC, USA, 2/3/14
  • How to Make Your Online Course Accessible: ILC, USA​, 3/31/14
  • iClickers, ILC, USA, 4/15/14
  • Sakai 101: Gradebook, Tests & Quizzes: ILC, USA, 5/30/14
  • StudyMate Author: ILC, USA, 6/16/14

 

Sandra Rogers

AbeBooks Video: Long Live the Book

Bibliophile or Logophile?

Book jacet of a Gene Autry western novel

Recently, I thought about why I love books so much.  Was it from the scarcity of books in my childhood due to poverty?  Or perhaps the  household ban on library books because mom was tired of paying  fines for overdue or lost books  for the previous 6 siblings?    Is it from the companionship that a shelf full of books provided me during my isolated nights during my Peace Corps service?  Could it be from the joy of “discovering” classic children’s books when I became an elementary educator?  Probably all of the above.

A bibliophile loves books, while a logophile loves words.  Which category describes me best?  Should there be a distinction?  According to the Merriam-Webster Learners Dictionary, “Logophile comes from two Greek roots–logos, meaning “speech, word, reason” and philos, meaning “dear, friendly”…” My love for language led me to become an English language teacher; my love for words led me to study poetry.  I’m trilingual, so obviously I love words in other languages, too.  Sometimes I just like the way they sound. Take for instance the Italian word for the number 15, quindici (It’s also the name of a town in Italy).  Have a listen:

http://en.bab.la/dictionary/italian-english/quindici

I believe I’m a biblio-logophile because I love both words and books. For example, I just started an online bookstore to pay for my graduate school books.  My desk is stacked with books whose value are to be determined.  I’m having fun learning the  bookseller’s vocabulary such as  foxing, endpapers, fronticepiece, and fore edges.  Collecting rare and unique books has broadened my knowledge of important writers and illustrators across disciplines.  I love finding out what makes each book unique.

Now that I’ve made my first sales, I’m excited about sharing the love of books with others.  My first customer wanted to know the story behind a book in my collection.  Only a bibliophile would want to hear a story about a book’s ownership and provenance.  I was thrilled to provide him with the details.  What about you?  Are you more of bibliophile or a logophile? Visit Teacherrogers Bookstore in your pursuit of knowledge, treasures, or for the love of words.

Pictorial board of a Mark Twain book shows a riverboat