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Learning2gether with Dawn Bikowski discussing gaming and language learning

31 Dec

teacherrogers:

Thanks to Vance Stevens and Dawn Bikowski for putting together this learning event.

Originally posted on Learning2gether:

Download mp3 here: http://learning2getherdotnet.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/2014aug31dawnbikowski-64k.mp3

On Sun Aug 31 Learning2gether was honored to meet with Dawn Bikowski discussing gaming and language learning

Dawn discussed projects she’s working on for teacher training by putting digital gaming into her MA teacher training courses, including pedagogical grammar and teaching reading & writing. She also talked about her experiences as lead author of the teacher’s manual for the digital game Trace Effects, which she did for the U.S. Department of State.

http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2012/12/k-12/u-s-state-department-launches-online-game-to-aid-english-learners/

Dawn mentioned using Aurasma with teacher trainees in her discussion with us. On YouTube you can see many examples of what Aurasma does; e.g., http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBKy-hSedg8 and she explained in greater detail in her talk at the CALL-IS and IATEFL LTSIG webinar on Gaming and Gamification on Jun 14 this year, where she spent 10 minutes talking about Aurasma and how she uses it to help teachers experience games.

TESOL CALL-IS Keynote, Dawn Bikowski
Training Teachers to Think in Games

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Gamer Vs. Educator Semiotic Domains a la J. P. Gee

8 Nov

Interrelated Processes: Problem-solving, Critical Thinking and Creative Thinking

23 Aug

 Do you think that problem solving, critical thinking, and creative thinking are synonymous?

In order to solve problems effectively and efficiently, you need to use creative thinking and critical thinking.  Jonassen (2000) created a typology of problem solving.  He identified 11 types of problems: logical problems, algorithms, story problems, rule using problems, decision-making, trouble-shooting, diagnoses solution, strategic performance, case analysis, designs, and dilemmas.  He described each type of problem’s resolution process.  For example, if a problem presents limited variables that can be controlled through manipulation, then an analyst would know that they have a logical problem by referring to Jonassen’s typology chart.  Logical problems are “discovered” in Jonassen’s description of its structuredness, where discovered refers to solutions drawn from logic.  Determining the logic model is a type of critical thinking process.  Problem solving depends on the type of problem and its structuredness, context, inputs, abstractness, and activities (Jonassen, 2004).  Therefore, critically analyze the type of problem and its structuredness.

The overarching strategy for problem analysis involves the steadfast engagement of critical thinking processes.  Using a systematic process assists you with adequately thinking though the complexity and multifarious components of problem solving.  Some instructional design approaches ask questions in a stepwise process to analyze problems.  For example, Harless’ (1974) first question in the process of front-end analysis asks: “Do we have a problem?”  Learners must use critical thinking to avoid making assumptions about a situation.  Is it a problem or an opportunity?  Dick, Carey, and Carey (2009) suggested that novice instructional designers develop their critical thinking skills to become effective performance analysts.  They urged analysts to be open-minded and view problems from multiple perspectives.  Critical thinking processes include synthesis of a problem statement, front-end analysis (FEA), triangulation of data collection, root cause analysis, active listening, system-wide checks and balances, and reflective thinking.  For example, thinking critically will help you avoid various FEA pitfalls such as Groupthink.

Addressing a problem strategically takes some creative thinking.  For example, there are timesaving strategies and models for problem analysis such as Jonassen’s idea of keeping a fault database.  When I read about this, I thought of how simple, yet, creative this strategy was.  Have you heard of Toyoda’s Why Tree? It’s a creative and simple technique for getting to the root cause of a problem.  He first used the method in the Toyota manufacturing process in 1958.  It consists of 5 why-questions that represent deeper levels of understanding the problem.  For each answer, you ask why until you uncover the true root cause.  Responses are mapped out according to different leads/reasons.  There are 3 benefits to using this process.  First, the different branches/reasons that stem from a problem statement can lead to more than one root cause and various interventions.  Second, it creates a mental map for synthesis of a presenting problem.  Third, it will aid novice analysts in digging deeper to uncover the real root causes and avoid superficial conclusions.  This creative process utilizes deductive reasoning, which is a type of critical thinking.  Therefore, critical thinking, creative thinking, and problem solving are interrelated processes but not interchangeable terms.

Thanks to my 700+ subscribers on WordPress!

2 Mar

Dear Readers,

I’m not sure when it happened, but my blog subscription increased from 100+ to 700+ readers! Thank you very much for your readership. My blog is my landing strip to all of my projects, so I take great care in keeping it up-to-date. It also reflects my learning curve, as I post my homework assignments from my doctoral studies in instructional design. It’s very encouraging to know that all my effort in sharing is actually being received.  To celebrate, I thought I’d share a festive machinima I filmed at a cast party in Second Life. I’m the cat avatar. Enjoy!

Variables Affecting Learning (Updated Model)

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AbeBooks Video: Long Live the Book

29 Jul

Greetings!

12 Jul

I’ve been wanting to create my own blog for some time now.  Currently, I blog for a nonprofit, and I have to follow their mission statement with each thought.  I’m excited about talking to other educators about integrating technology into the classroom. My other blog had limited widgets and plugin capability, so I’m thrilled to finally cross over to the wonderful world of WordPress.com and all its technological temptations!

I also look forward to working with my future students on this blog.  I’ve envied other teachers’ blogs long enough; it’s time for me to make my own classroom blogspot.  At the eve of my new teaching/learning curve, I lift my glass of ginger ale and toast the beginning of blogging for my teaching career.  I can only promise that I’ll be consistent in trying to educate and challenge both myself, other teachers, and my students.

—Sandra Annette Rogers

is TeacherRogers.wordpress.com

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