My K-5 Elementary School Literature Products on Sale at TPT

I’m a teacher-author on TeachersPayTeachers.com (aka #TPT). I’m having a 20% off sale for cyber Monday and Tuesday on everything (#CYBER2016)! Here are the descriptions of a few of my seasonal elementary products aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Gingerbread Man with bow tie near stack of other cookies says, "Catch me if you can, I'm the Gingerbread Man!"

K-2 Story Illustration: The Gingerbread Man

This is an 18-page document with text from  story retold by Sandra Rogers in which students are provided space to illustrate the story to match the meaning described in the text. 12 vocabulary words are boldface typed within the story with definitions provided on a glossary page. It includes a vocabulary pretest.  The end purpose is to have students read it to their parents or other students in the school.  Students will be eager to learn the new words such as plump, almonds, and hay, so that they could accurately illustrate their self-made booklet.  This activity correlates to the following #CCSS on Speaking and Listening: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:
Kinder: #5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
Grade 1: #5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
Grade 2: #5. Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. (Note: The text and drawings can serve as the storyboard for recordings.)

Other similar products include the following:

Image of Santa on sleigh pulled by reindeer

K-3 Poetry Illustration: ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas #CCSS SL.K.5, SL.1.5, SL.2.5, SL.3.5

K-3 Holiday Literacy Pack Bundled product includes those mentioned in this blog post plus 2 literacy center posters (Reading and Writing), a literacy activity checklist, and a generic strategy usage form for self-evaluation. #CCSS SL.K.5, SL.1.5, SL.2.5, SL.3.5


Pine Wreath with burlap flowers from Colonial Williamsburg

Wintertime in Colonial Williamsburg 5th Grade PowerPoint Presentation

The 15 images in the presentation are photos taken of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia in the winter. The purpose of the presentation is to give students a glimpse of colonial life. The photos include children’s toys, holiday wreaths, a bedroom, chamber pot, a kitchen, a dining room, a coal-burning furnace, a cellar, a garden maze, the Governor’s Palace (The Wythe House), the Royal Capitol, a home, wallpaper, a horse-drawn carriage, and a soldier’s drum. The PowerPoint slides include brief lecture notes.


*These literature activities are also available for sale individually. Other products include Spanish language editions.

**All my products are on sale for TPT’s #CYBER2016!

Thank you for shopping Teacherrogers store!

Happy holidays,

Sandra Rogers,
Instructional Designer

Mini-lecture and Photos of Colonial Williamsburg for 5th Graders

Pine Wreath with burlap flowers from Colonial Williamsburg

The 15 images in this presentation are photos I took of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia a few winters ago.  I was amazed by the beauty of the old fashioned traditions like the image above with burlap and cotton bolls as ornamentation for the Christmas wreath.  This is one of my products on TeachersPayTeachers.

The purpose of the presentation is to give students a glimpse of colonial life. Photos include children’s toys, holiday wreaths, a bedroom, chamber pot, a kitchen, a dining room, a coal-burning furnace, a cellar, a garden maze, the Governor’s Palace (The Wythe House), the Royal Capitol, a home, wallpaper, a horse-drawn carriage, and a soldier’s drum. The PowerPoint slides include brief lecture notes.

Most school curriculum teach about the 13 colonies and the American Revolutionary  in the 5th grade, as part of history class.  Check out my store on TPT if you are interested in purchasing it.

Thanks to all of my TPT supporters for another great year!

Sandra Rogers

aka Teacherrogers

The Gingerbread Man Doesn’t Escape Common Core

Gingerbread Man with bow tie near stack of other cookies says, "Catch me if you can, I'm the Gingerbread Man!"
Students illustrate text.

In preparation for the Cyber Monday sale, I wanted to share some of my holiday-related educational products available for sale on TeachersPayTeachers.

This is an 18-page document with text from The Gingerbread Man story retold by Sandra Rogers in which students are provided space to illustrate the story to match the meaning described in the text. Twelve vocabulary words are boldface typed within the story with definitions provided on a glossary page. A vocabulary pretest is included, as well.

The end purpose is to have students read it to their parents or other students in the school. This was a popular activity I used in my first grade class during English language arts. Students were eager to learn the new words such as plump, almonds, and hay, so that they could accurately illustrate their self-made booklet. This would make an excellent literacy center independent project that they could work on for days.

Common Core State Standards: This activity correlates to the following CCSS on Speaking and Listening: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:
Kindergarten: #5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
Grade 1: #5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
Grade 2: #5. Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. (Note: The text and drawings can serve as the storyboard for recordings.)

Directions:  You can use this material in two different ways in the English language arts or English as a second language class activities. For example, you can distribute the pages among your class and have the students illustrate the part of the story on their page. Then the teacher can compile them into a book for the class library for the students to read. On the other hand, you can use this activity as an individual assignment and have the students illustrate their very own booklet.

Thank you for shopping Teacherrogers store!  The Cyber Smile Sitewide Sale (#TPTCyberSmile) is Nov 30th & Dec 1st.

Sandra Rogers,
Instructional Designer

Check out my other K-3 illustration activity for the holiday: Santa Meets the Common Core.

15% TPT Sale on Halloween Themed Educational Products

Girl dressed for Halloween going trick-or-treating
Happy Halloween!

Dear Readers,

It’s been a while since I posted anything about my TPT store. This weekend and Columbus Day, I’m having a sale on all of my Halloween inspired educational products.  Check them out! When you purchase these you gain access to the download and can start using them right away.

Elementary Halloween Song in Spanish with images and lyrics on a PowerPoint;  complete song on my YouTube channel. See link for details.

K-3 Halloween Literacy Center Games with directions, rules, and printable game pieces. Won’t you be my first buyer?  This is an awesome product that hasn’t sold yet. Buyers rely on product feedback, so make sure you leave some.

Middle School (MS) poetry study: 3 sets of questions and answers for 3 spooky poems of Edgar Allan Poe, available in English and Spanish; aligned with Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Product provides links to poetry.

MS novelette study: questions and answers for R. L. Stevensons’ Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, aligned with CCSS and also available in English and Spanish. If you don’t have this novel, download a free eBook and podcast from The Gutenberg Project! See product info.

MS short story study: questions and answers for Henry Jame’s A Problem. This is aligned with CCSS and also available in English and Spanish.  A link to the story is provided with the product.

I also have Q&A for Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight in English and Spanish.

The MS literature products are also sold in a bundles in English and Spanish, which are on sale this weekend.  If you’re not a member of TPT, you can create an account for free.  This allows you to access the thousands of freebies available from millions of teachers on the site.

Sandra Rogers,

Teacherrogers Store

TeachersPayTeachers.com (TPT)

Well-designed Educational Gaming vs. Playful Learning

TeachersPayTeachers: Halloween Literacy Gaming Activity

Girl dressed for Halloween going trick-or-treating
Happy Halloween!

I just uploaded a new product that incorporates gaming as an instructional strategy. I used Halloween vocabulary and images to capture young children’s interest. Students can practice syllabification, reading, storytelling, and vocabulary when playing these games! This product contains directions and material for four different types of games to use during literacy centers: clapping out the syllables, vocabulary battle game, vocabulary flashcards, and storytelling. Each game would last 30 minutes, which is about the same amount of time segment in group rotation in a 2-hour literacy block.

This product includes the following items:

  • a game scorecard;
  • a paper candy reward system;
  • directions;
  • 24 different game cards with the vocabulary word, image, and the number of syllables, and
  • 24 vocabulary cards without the name or syllable count for testing purposes.

Vocabulary includes basic words like bat and hat, as well as multisyllabic ones like Halloween and October. I suggest printing the vocabulary on card stock and laminating them prior to use. I think students are really going to enjoy these activities. Hopefully, they will want to play them multiple times to become very familiar with the content vocabulary. I also suggest having the students create their own games and corresponding rules.

Here’s a sample game:

#2A: Vocabulary Battle Game: The objective of the game is to correctly read the word for each card drawn.

Learning Objective: Students will practice reading words correctly.

Game Rules: This game can be played with 2-4 players.

Step 1: Place vocabulary cards face down in a stack.

Step 2: Player 1 takes a card and tries to read it. Then he shows it to the other players to get feedback (correct or incorrect). If the student reads it correctly, then they keep the card. If not, then the card is placed in the “trash” pile to be reused.

Step 3: Player 2 repeats this action.

Step 4: After all the face down cards have been read, shuffle the deck of discarded cards to continue the game. The player with the most cards wins. Students redeem cards for candy or other reward at the end of the game.

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Visit my store on TeachersPayTeachers to purchase this product! I plan to do the same gaming products based on content vocabulary for each holiday.

Sandra Rogers

Teachers’ Perspectives on Gaming as an Instructional Strategy for Children

Icon of game consul
How do you feel about gaming as an instructional strategy?

I’m interested in researching well-designed educational gaming for use in the elementary classroom, particularly computer-assisted language learning. The reason being is that elementary education and second language acquisition are my areas of expertise.  I hope to incorporate gaming theory and design into my knowledge base as an instructional designer. There is so much potential for optimizing learning in the elementary classroom with the use of well-designed educational games.

I acknowledge the difficulty of conducting research in the classroom, so I would focus on the phenomenology (qualitative research) of elementary teachers reflections on gaming as an instructional strategy. One of my professors mentioned the idea of getting feedback from primary school teachers enrolled in the various education programs at the university. I plan to use the mixed methods approach. I found literature on the correlation of Gagne’s (1985) nine events of instruction and gaming as an instructional strategy (Becker, 2008).

Currently, research on the effectiveness of educational gaming with children is scarce (Thai, Lowenstein, Ching, & Rejeski, 2009). Nonetheless, there are some great literature reviews like the one completed by The Joan Ganz Gooney Center at Sesame Workshop (Thai et al., 2009). Also, Reiber, Barbour, Thomas, and Rauscher (2008) found no statistical significance in their literature review comparing gaming and traditional learning; however, they stated that this is par for the course with any new educational technology compared with traditional learning.

For now, I’m conducting literature reviews on gaming as an instructional strategy with young children.

Becker, K. (2008). Video game pedagogy: Good games = Good pedagogy. In C. T. Miller (Ed.), Games: Purpose and potential in education (pp. 73-122). NY: Springer.

Gagné, R. M. (1985). The conditions of learning. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.

Reiber, L. P., Barbour, M.K, Thomas, G. B., & Rauscher, D. (2008) Learning by designing games: Homemade PowerPoint games. In C. T. Miller (Ed.), Games: Purpose and potential in education (pp 23-40). NY: Springer.

Thai, A. M., Lowenstein, D., Ching, D., & Rejeski, D. (2009). Game changer: Investing in children’s play to advance children’s learning and health. New York: The Joan Ganz Gooney Center at Sesame Workshop.

Read another literature review on gaming for second language learning: https://teacherrogers.wordpress.com/2013/11/27/gaming-as-an-instructional-strategy-for-language-learning/