Join me at AECT 2019 in Las Vegas!

The word, Inspired, is written against a purple splash of paint.
AECT 2019 Inspired Theme logo

Association for Educational Communications and Technology

The Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is a fantastic professional organization for instructional designers, instructional technologists, educational technology support staff, instructors, and education researchers. Why? Because they do fun stuff like ‘Breakfast with Champions’ and ‘Game Night.’   I learned about it from my professors in my doctoral program who promoted AECT and their educational technology standards to their students. AECT’s 2019 international convention will be held in Las Vegas, NV from October 21st-25th at the Convention Center. This year’s convention theme is Inspired Professional Learning. Inspired Learning Professionals. Let me know if you plan to attend so we can network and attend sessions and events together.

Sessions

I’m excited to share that the following three presentations were accepted! I’m really happy to be able to lead an Inspire! session, which is a new format to provide 50-minute professional development without the extra cost.  I invite you to attend my sessions below.

Host: Design and Development (D&D) Division

Magis Instructional Design Model for Transformative Teaching, Dr. Sandra Rogers

Wed, Oct 23, 10:00 to 10:20am, Convention Center, Pavilion 6 (Note: I’m first in this concurrent session.)

Description. The Magis Instructional Design Model endeavors to transform teaching online through the lens of critical pedagogy to place the human in a real-world context as much as possible through learning experiences and reflection. The goal being transformative learning experiences instead of transmissive ones that use the antiquated banking model of education. The model includes instructional strategies from the cognitive and affective domains. The Author asks for input and feedback on this model.

Host: D&D: Instructional Design in Context – Service

Roadmap to Reentry Resources in Mobile County to Prevent Recidivism Service Project, Dr. Sandra Rogers, Dr. Demetrius Semien, & Aubrey Whitten

Wed, Oct 23, 2:20 to 2:50pm, Convention Center, Ballroom C (Note: We’re second in this session.)

Description. Would you like to start a service project? Consider creating a Google Map of service providers that meet a strong need in your community (food deserts, homeless shelters, or the previously incarcerated). Presenters will share their service project developing a reentry map of service providers to combat recidivism in their community. Learn to plot locations, draw pathways, and add information to a Google Map. Participants will also share what they are doing in their communities.

Host: Culture, Learning, and Technology (CLT) Inspire!

Safeguard Your Online Persona by Using Various Techniques and Technologies, Dr. Sandra Rogers

Oct 25, 9:00 to 9:50am, Convention Center, Conference Rm 1 (Note: Workshop format so bring your devices!)

Description. Have you googled yourself lately? What does the Internet search reveal about you? With each hashtag, blog post, tweet, and online project, you are building your online reputation whether you want to or not. In the absence of professional branding, your online persona brands you. Learn to curate your online personal data (e.g., Google Alert for keywords & reverse search images) and leave with an action plan.

Handouts

For AECT members, I’ll place my presentation and paper on the conference online portal. For my blog readers, I posted my presentations to SlideShare and embedded them here.

In closing, the sessions at AECT are really good. The organization’s special interest groups are dynamic. Conference-goers are very open to making new friends and learning, and this includes the big names in the field. You may find yourself sitting beside David Wiley, Curt Bonk, Lloyd Rieber, Amy Bradshaw, or George Veletsianos!

Breakfast table with invited guest and Wheaties box in the center
Breakfast with Champion, George Veletsianos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Google Suite for the Universal Design of Learning

Design for gardining Website interface displays tools and supplies as icons
Bad Example: This Google Drawing was created for a doctoral mini project on an interface design task for developing a gardening website with one of my peers in an online course. This was created prior to my understanding of accessibility issues. Notice that not all icons are labeled. This would not be accessible to all. Additionally, the alternative text would need to be embedded with each image.

Google Suite, along with Google’s Chrome browser’s Omnibox and useful extensions, can be used to enhance the teaching of all learners with universal instructional design principles. Google Suite is the new name for these features: Google Apps (Docs, Forms, Sheets, Slides), Classroom, and Drive. This blog focuses on the use of technology to augment instruction through differentiation via scaffolding, formative assessments, and student collaboration. Google’s professional development opportunities and teacher resources are also addressed.

There are several efforts to design education with universal design in mind. Palmer and Caputo (2003) proposed seven principles for universal instructional design (UID): accessibility, consistency, explicitness, flexibility, accommodating learning spaces, minimization of effort, and supportive learning environments. The UID model recognizes those needs for course design. Its main premise is equal access to education and extends this to all types of learners and not just those with disabilities. For example, all learners can benefit from multi-modal lessons. Palmer and Caputo’s principles should be kept in mind as you develop differentiated instructional learning scenarios with Google Suite. See my blog post to learn more about the universal design for learning.

My College is a Google Apps for Education campus, which means we have unlimited storage on our Drive and seamless access to Google Suite through our school Gmail. Speak with your Google Suite administrator to learn about the features and functions of your access, as some institutions like my alma mater block YouTube and Google+. 

The following scenarios address possible technology solutions for teaching all learners. For instance, scaffolding supports different learners’ preferences, as well as the needs of lower-performing students. Formative assessments are important to obtain ongoing feedback on student performance; use these often. They can be formal or informal (practice tests, exit tickets, polls). Formative tests promote active learning, which leads to higher retention of information learned. Use the following list to add your ideas and scenarios for differentiated lesson planning.

Scaffold Learning Google Tools & Features Formative Assessments Your Ideas & Scenarios
Provide visuals for structure, context, or direction & just-in-time definitions Google Drawings, Docs’ Explore tool, & Drive Students make their own graphic representation of a concept or complete guided tasks with the frame provided by an instructor.
Provide authentic speaking practice prior to oral test/presentation Google Docs’ Voice Typing, Chrome Browser’s Omnibox for a timer, & Drive Students work individually or in small group turn-taking voice typing their scripts/stories on Google Doc within a timed parameter on a split-screen.
Check for comprehension to obtain data to drive instruction/remediation Google Forms, Sheets, Classroom, & Drive (Alternative: Google Slides new feature allows for asking questions & polling question priority live from slide.) Students take a quiz on Google Forms to demonstrate knowledge after a lesson (exit ticket) or homework. Instructors receive Form responses in a Google Sheet. Sheets has an Explore tool for analyzing data for a visual display for data-driven discussions among teacher cohort/supervisors. Auto import grades from Forms to Classroom gradebook.
Students use app with embedded choices to check their own grammar Free Chrome extension, Grammarly and/or app Students correct errors in their first writing drafts on the app or within online writing platforms (e.g., wiki, blog, or email). Grammarly is also available for MS Office and Windows but not for Google Docs. Use its app to check Docs or other writing formats by pasting content to New Document.
Hi/low peer collaboration and/or tutoring Google Apps, Classroom, & Drive Students share settings on project Docs, Drawings, etc. to collaborate via text comments or synchronous video chat sessions.

Resources for Digital Literacy Skill Training

  • Did you know that Google provides lesson plans for information literacy?
  • Do you need to teach your students how to refine their web searches? See Google Support.
  • Internet Safety Tip- Recommend that students use incognito browsing on Google Chrome when conducting searches to reduce their digital footprint. See Google’s YouTube playlist, Digital Citizenship and Security, and their training site for more information.

Accessibility Resources for Assistive Technology

Here’s the link to the G Suite User Guide for Accessibility.

  • ChromeVOX – Google’s screen reading extension for the Google Chrome browser and the screen reader used by Chrome Operating System (OS).
  • TalkBack – This is Google’s screen reading software that is typically included with Android devices. Due to the design of Android and its customizability by hardware manufacturers, TalkBack can vary and may not be included on some Android devices.
  • Screen Magnifier – This is the screen magnification software included with ChromeOS. The magnification function in ChromeOS doesn’t have a unique product name like other platforms.
  • Hey, Google – This is Google’s personal assistant, which is available on the Google Chrome browser, ChromeOS, and many Android devices.

Professional Development for Educators

Other Tools and Support

References

Palmer, J., & Caputo, A. (2003). Universal instructional design: Implementation guide. Guelph, Ontario: University of Guelph.

ECTESOL Conference in Pensacola Feb. 3rd

Tag words from my blog

The Emerald Coast TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) conference is this Saturday from 10-3 at University of West Florida International Center. The registration is $25 and includes lunch. The conference will feature professionals from northern Florida panhandle and the Alabama Gulf Coast. As a new Board member, this will be my first time attending. Here’s the schedule:

9:30 – 10:00 Registration
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome – Council Vaughn, Director, International English Program
Overview of Conference – Dr. Arlene Costello, VP/ECTESOL Conference Chair
10:15 – 10:50 Keynote Speaker: Chane Eplin, Bureau Chief, Student Achievement through Language Acquisition, Florida Department of Education
Topic Address: Quality Education for English Learners K-12 and Beyond
10:55 – 11:30 Concurrent Sessions
Room 1: ELs as Independent and Autonomous Learners (Kiss/Costello)
Room 2: Google Suite to Enhance English Language Instruction (Rogers)
11:35 – 12:00 Lunch and 12:00 – 12:15 Cultural Performances DOOR PRIZES
12:20 – 1:00 Featured Keynote Speaker: Dr. Susan Ferguson Martin, Faculty, ESOL and Educational Leadership, University of South Alabama
Topic Address: Academic Language in Teaching and Learning Across the Curriculum: A Functional Approach
1:05 – 1:35 Panel – Speakers
Grace McCaffery, Founder, Costa Latina
Shannon Nickinson, Project Manager, Early Learning Studer Institute
1:40 – 2:15 Concurrent Sessions
Room 1: Sowing Seeds (Sessions & Cuyuch)
Room 2: ESOL, EFL, and Reciprocal Service Learning (Fregeau, Leier, Ojiambo, Cornejo, and Chikatia)
2:20 – 2:50 Concurrent Sessions
Room 1: The SUCCESS from Teachers, Students, and Parents Working Together (Baker)
Room 2: Saudi ELLs’ Digital Gameplay Habits and Effects on LA (Rogers)
2:50 – 3:00 Brief Business Meeting: Report by President; Paper Report by Treasurer
Closing: Amany Habib, ECTESOL President DOOR PRIZES
3:00 – 3:20 ECTESOL Board Meeting


I’ll be presenting a case study on gameplay habits and an information session on Google Suite for enhancing English language instruction. I hope to see you there!

Google Provides Free Professional Development Online for Educators

Google Certified Educator Badge

I just completed free professional development offered to educators on Google Apps for Education to become a Google Certified Educator. Level 1 is on the fundamentals of Google Suite (Docs, Slides, Sheets, Forms, & YouTube), Google Classroom, and Google Drive.  It’s a competency-based, self-directed learning program.

I’ve been using Google Apps since 2009. This training was a great way to learn about the latest updates to the Google Suite of tools.  Additionally, it made me think about different ways that technology can help solve various teaching issues, save resources, communicate more with parents, and increase student collaboration.

Initially, I thought I’d be able to complete the 13 units for Level 1 in a few months. However, my work, service, and research took priority, and I ended up doing this training a little bit over time. It took me a year! The self-tests are challenging even for a more advanced user like myself.  The exam is performance-based, so make sure you review all the units carefully.

I plan to continue through the training levels to become a certified trainer. I’m a trainer at my College on a wide range of technology and pedagogy, and can’t wait to start sharing what I learned with the faculty and staff.  I’ve already emailed the librarians several tech tips that they might use.  My two biggest takeaways would be the powerful potential of Google Groups (e.g. staff-instructor, trainer-staff, or student-teacher interactions) and the advances that have been made in Google Classroom (too numerous to mention).

I encourage you to check out their Training Center.  The certifying exams are inexpensive (e.g., $10 for Level 1). They provide a certificate and a digital badge. The certification only lasts three years. I think at the current rate of technology advancement that is fair.

Gamer Vs. Educator Semiotic Domains a la J. P. Gee

My Google Apps for Education Blog Posts

This week, I was asked to share my knowledge on Google Drive with colleagues at work.  I figured it was time to resurrect a couple of useful blog posts! Here’s my collection on the various educational uses of Google apps for education (referred to as #GAFE).

  1. Basic Tech Tools: Google Drive,  Maps, Google+, and Translations (blog)
  2. Create a Google Site from a Gmail Account (video)

  3.  I Love Google Scholar Alerts! (blog)

  4. What are Google Drawings? (infographic)

  5. Using Google Suite for Universal Design (blog)

  6. Google Map of Re-Entry Service Providers in Mobile County (blog)

  7. Google Provides Free Professional Development for Educators (blog)

Sandra Rogers

I love Google’s Scholar Alerts!

 

Updated 10/28/19

If you’re not using Google Alerts yet, sign up to receive them for general use. You don’t need a Gmail account to do this. You can set one up on any topic. For example, I have one set up for my name and my online moniker.

For scholarly work, go to Google Scholar Alerts and select the Alerts envelop icon. It’s located in the upper left-hand corner of the drop-down menu. See Richard Byrne’s video tutorial on Google Scholar Alerts and Google Scholar Libraries. You can also establish a profile for your work on Google Scholar.

I’m using alerts to keep up-to-date with the latest research on educational gaming, elearning, and my products. The periodic updates keep me actively reviewing articles.

Here’s an example from my inbox:


Date: Sat, Mar 8, 2014 at 12:24 AM
Subject: Scholar Alert – [ “educational gaming” “traditional learning” ]
To: teacherrogers@gmail.com
Scholar Alert: [ “educational gaming” “traditional learning” ]

An Approach to Utilize Ubiquitous Devices for a Game-Based Learning Environment

T Tachino, K Yokota, A Madden – The Journal of Information and Systems in …, 2013
 These data were summarized for the practical design of educational gaming applications played
on smartphones and mobile phones. Smartphone and mobile phone approaches were important
methods in assessing individual performance and during the debriefing phase. 
This Google Scholar Alert is brought to you by Google.

 


Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D.

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