Keynote: Online Course Design for Active Learning within the UDL Framework

This past fall, I gave my first keynote presentation at the University of Houston (UH) to faculty and staff. Their 1-day conference, Innovative Teaching and Learning at a Distance (ITLD), focused on the Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Several of the co-authors for the Routledge book, Universal Access Through Inclusive Instructional Design: International Perspectives on UDL (Gronseth & Dalton, 2019), were invited to give sessions. Mine addressed online course design for active learning within the UDL framework. See my blog post on this topic for more details. This presentation is hosted on SlideShare.

I also provided a pre-conference workshop on how to use my Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric (copyright 2015 by Rogers & Van Haneghan). In both sessions, I used Mentimeter to engage the participants, as well as pair-share activities. Both sessions were well received. Some of the instructional designers stated that they want to use my rubric for their work and research! I had such a wonderful time at the UH, and the ITLD staff and professors were very kind to me. I’m a Texan, so I appreciated the Texas hospitality!

Blog #200: My New Instructional Design Job at UCLA

Sandra Rogers stands in front of the UCLA Bruin bear statue
UCLA is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year!
How I Got to Here

After completing my doctoral program in 2017, I looked for employment that would utilize and reward my Ph.D. and research efforts. I was working for a small college near my alma mater for which I am grateful to have had my start as an instructional designer (ID). My reference to how I got here refers to leaving a small college to work for the number one public university in the US. One of my new acquaintances said my work experience sounded like I was a ’20-year overnight success’! Jokes aside, all my past work experience (20 years as an educator + 7 as an ID) has lead me to this new role. View my LinkedIn Profile to learn more.

I’d like to give a shout out to the Educause Listserv for instructional designers for alerting me to this position. When I read the posting from the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), I knew I had a good chance because I met all the criteria including the preferred ones. This was due to my broad work experience including fellowships and partly from my serving as the only ID for a small college and wearing multiple hats (e.g., designer, trainer, learning management system administrator). By 2019, I had fined tuned my resume, portfolio, and interview skills after submitting 25+ applications and landing relevant interviews with the Carnegie Foundation, Harvard, and Global LT.

My New Role

I’m part of a team of 5 IDs working on the UCLA Chancellor’s initiative for online teaching and learning. We’re a diverse team in our skill set and experience with shared education and interests. I’ve been on the job for six months now and have learned so much from my team and colleagues across campus. There are other IDs on our campus working to support specific departments or academic units, while we assist any instructor who’s interested in designing a hybrid or fully online course in our new Instructional Design Studio.

I’m currently co-designing two new courses with different instructors that will be offered in Spring quarter. UCLA uses Moodle as their LMS. I blogged about one of the courses I’m co-designing for the new minor in urban literature for the English Department. It’s a hybrid Irish literature course. The other course is for the Classics Department and will cover medical terminology through the sociocultural and historical context of Greek and Latin. For that course, I’m  co-developing H5P interactive learning objects to review course concepts and terminology. See my blog post on H5P: Free Software.

My other role as instructional designer is to support existing online courses and provide technical training. I’ve been able to shadow and learn from one of my new colleagues that has been at UCLA for many years. I’m helping her support existing courses (e.g., refreshing dates, checking links, configuring TA discussion sessions), as well as transitioning to new technologies. For example, UCLA instructors will use Respondus LockDown Browser and Monitor for unproctored online tests. I used this at my prior workplace, so I’ve taken the initiative to learn all I can to train my team, instructors, and TAs, as well as develop supporting documents (e.g, FAQs, practice tests, student guides).

Challenges

Any new job comes with a learning curve. For technologists, it’s even steeper! I wasn’t familiar with designing courses on Moodle nor Canvas, which are both used for distance education in the UC system. My first month on the job I had to learn both of these in addition to workplace culture, university policy, UCLA campus, and all the acronyms used to describe the various learning communities of practice. Plus, I decided to get a new type of computer, a MS Surface Pro (tablet with stylus and detachable keyboard and special dongle for connections). My transition would have been a lot easier if I had gone with something familiar.

Fortunately, I didn’t have to learn my way around Los Angeles because I lived here 20 years ago. It was a challenge moving across the country and leaving my house behind to be setup as rental property for the first time. I’m feeling settled in now. I’ve even reconnected with old friends here. I also have family in California. Other LA challenges have been the earthquakes this summer and the nearby fires this fall. I’ve got my emergency kit in the car and backpack in the house.

Next Steps

It looks like our new office space will be ready upon our return on Jan 2nd. I look forward to working with my teammates and instructors in our new space. We’re housed in the Young Research Library on campus that has great multimedia interactive pod spaces and the 451 Cafe area where we can meet with instructors besides are office space. I have 4 other new courses in the initial planning phase that I’ll report on as they develop. They are all equally exciting to me. I feel extremely blessed to have this opportunity.


I can’t believe this is my 200th blog! As mentioned on #199, I’ve gone back and revised blogs as I’ve grown academically. If you’ve been with me for the past decade, thank you! If you’re a new reader, welcome. What comes next may be a podcast or vlog. I’d love to hear your feedback.

Cheers!

Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D.

Teacherrogers Products
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Universal Access Through Inclusive Instructional Design: International Perspectives on UDL

The logo has the word accessibility with four icons on it: eye, hand, ear, and brain.

I’d like to let you know about the first edition of Universal Access Through Inclusive Instructional Design: International Perspectives on UDL from Routledge.  It’s co-edited by the Society of Information Technology and Teacher Educations’s Universal Design for Learning (UDL) special interest group Co-chairs, Drs. Susie Gronseth (University of Houston) and Elizabeth Dalton (University of Rhode Island).

This book “explores the ways that educators around the world reduce barriers for students with disabilities and other challenges by planning and implementing accessible, equitable, high-quality curricula. Incorporating key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning, these dynamic contributions highlight essential supports for flexibility in student engagement, representation of content, and learner action and expression.”

I wrote a snapshot for this book on the following: Using the YouTube Automated Captioning Tool for Video Lectures. It’s based on my work at Spring Hill College in designing its new online Theology program. See my abstract below.

Abstract

“This snapshot describes the use of the YouTube automated captioning tool as a low-cost means for do-it-yourself captioning of video lectures to meet the federal guidelines for distance education. A graduate program took this approach when adapting their courses to the online environment, even though they had no prior experience with YouTube channels or captioning. With technical support from their instructional designer, they successfully launched their unlisted YouTube channels with their video lectures. In the process, they noticed how they optimized the course environment in accordance with the Universal Design of Learning (UDL) framework.”

There are many more instructional design snapshots for each chapter. Check it out!  Free review in eBook format available for instructors considering this book for course adoption.

References

Gronseth, S. L., & Dalton, E. M. (Eds.). (2019). Universal access through inclusive instructional design: International perspectives on UDL. New York, NY: Routledge.

Rogers, S. (2019). Snapshot – Using the YouTube automated captioning tool for video lectures. In S. L. Gronseth & E. M. Dalton (Eds.), Universal access through inclusive instructional design: International perspectives on UDL. New York, NY: Routledge.


P.S. Our book was displayed at the Routledge table at the AECT conference in Las Vegas.

Sandra Rogers is holding the educational book in which she is a co-author. She's standing in front of a table of other books displayed by Routledge.

Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D.

Join me at AECT 2019 in Las Vegas!

The word, Inspired, is written against a purple splash of paint.
AECT 2019 Inspired Theme logo

Association for Educational Communications and Technology

The Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is a fantastic professional organization for instructional designers, instructional technologists, educational technology support staff, instructors, and education researchers. Why? Because they do fun stuff like ‘Breakfast with Champions’ and ‘Game Night.’   I learned about it from my professors in my doctoral program who promoted AECT and their educational technology standards to their students. AECT’s 2019 international convention will be held in Las Vegas, NV from October 21st-25th at the Convention Center. This year’s convention theme is Inspired Professional Learning. Inspired Learning Professionals. Let me know if you plan to attend so we can network and attend sessions and events together.

Sessions

I’m excited to share that the following three presentations were accepted! I’m really happy to be able to lead an Inspire! session, which is a new format to provide 50-minute professional development without the extra cost.  I invite you to attend my sessions below.

Host: Design and Development (D&D) Division

Magis Instructional Design Model for Transformative Teaching, Dr. Sandra Rogers

Wed, Oct 23, 10:00 to 10:20am, Convention Center, Pavilion 6 (Note: I’m first in this concurrent session.)

Description. The Magis Instructional Design Model endeavors to transform teaching online through the lens of critical pedagogy to place the human in a real-world context as much as possible through learning experiences and reflection. The goal being transformative learning experiences instead of transmissive ones that use the antiquated banking model of education. The model includes instructional strategies from the cognitive and affective domains. The Author asks for input and feedback on this model.

Host: D&D: Instructional Design in Context – Service

Roadmap to Reentry Resources in Mobile County to Prevent Recidivism Service Project, Dr. Sandra Rogers, Dr. Demetrius Semien, & Aubrey Whitten

Wed, Oct 23, 2:20 to 2:50pm, Convention Center, Ballroom C (Note: We’re second in this session.)

Description. Would you like to start a service project? Consider creating a Google Map of service providers that meet a strong need in your community (food deserts, homeless shelters, or the previously incarcerated). Presenters will share their service project developing a reentry map of service providers to combat recidivism in their community. Learn to plot locations, draw pathways, and add information to a Google Map. Participants will also share what they are doing in their communities.

Host: Culture, Learning, and Technology (CLT) Inspire!

Safeguard Your Online Persona by Using Various Techniques and Technologies, Dr. Sandra Rogers

Oct 25, 9:00 to 9:50am, Convention Center, Conference Rm 1 (Note: Workshop format so bring your devices!)

Description. Have you googled yourself lately? What does the Internet search reveal about you? With each hashtag, blog post, tweet, and online project, you are building your online reputation whether you want to or not. In the absence of professional branding, your online persona brands you. Learn to curate your online personal data (e.g., Google Alert for keywords & reverse search images) and leave with an action plan.

Handouts

For AECT members, I’ll place my presentation and paper on the conference online portal. For my blog readers, I posted my presentations to SlideShare and embedded them here.

In closing, the sessions at AECT are really good. The organization’s special interest groups are dynamic. Conference-goers are very open to making new friends and learning, and this includes the big names in the field. You may find yourself sitting beside David Wiley, Curt Bonk, Lloyd Rieber, Amy Bradshaw, or George Veletsianos!

Breakfast table with invited guest and Wheaties box in the center
Breakfast with Champion, George Veletsianos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Courses Available on Schoology’s Public Resources

In my departure from a College that uses Schoology, I thought of ways that I might be able to save my online course designs for future use even though my new workplace doesn’t use this learning management system (LMS).  Fortunately, I was able to save the entire course files, not just the individual material.

First, I saved them to my Schoology personal Resources (aka Home), then I downloaded the courses as Common Cartridge (IMACC or Zip) files for future use. The Instructional Mangement System (IMS) Global Learning Consortium states that Common Cartridge is a formatting standard for the interoperability of content within other systems. See their Brief Primer on Common Cartridge Conformance. In Schoology, you can upload and export these types of course files. See the Schoology Help Center on this topic.

I also decided to share them on Schoology’s Public Resources so others can use them. To be clear, I’m only sharing the content that I created. See Figure 1 for the location of these free resources. Schoology doesn’t make it easy to locate by name, so you’ll need to filter the results by Resource Type (higher ed) and File Format (folder), etc.

Screenshot of the Schoology interface displaying the Public Resources icon on the left-hand side. The icon has a bookshelf with a globe beside it.
Figure 1. Schoology’s Public Resources

Anyone can sign up for an individual Schoology account to access them if their institution does not subscribe to this LMS. Here are the two courses that I shared:

  • Accessibility Workshop for Online Learning in Distance Education – I used this for faculty professional development for meeting accessibility federal guidelines in course design.
  • Critical Reading 101 Demo Hybrid Course – I used this for an actual developmental reading course for college students and as a demonstration course for faculty training purposes.

Schoology users can share their courses and other content on its Public Resources by selecting the bookshelf with globe icon beside the material in your personal resources. See Figure 2 for location. If you use either of my course content, I would love to hear about it!

Screenshot of Schoology user's Personal Resources with pop-up comment beside Public Resources icon indicating to share if selected.
Figure 2. Schoology’s Public Resources sharing tool

Continue reading “My Courses Available on Schoology’s Public Resources”

Join me at AERA 2019 in Toronto

Sandra Rogers standing near AERA conference sign celebrating 100 years

I’ll be attending my second conference of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) this year. The theme is ‘Leveraging Education Research in a Post-Truth Era: Multimodal Narratives to Democratize Evidence.’  It will be held in Toronto, Canada from April 5-9th at the Metro Toronto Conference Centre. I was impressed with last year’s conference but a bit overwhelmed. Hopefully, with the help of their conference app, I’ll find the sessions I need.

View this our presentation poster for Dr. Khoury and my session: Rubric to Analyze Online Course Syllabi Plan for Engendering a Community of Inquiry: Round II. Come join me on Saturday morning, April 6, from 8:00 to 9:30am in the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 300 Level, Hall C. It’s hosted by the Division C – Section 3b: Technology-Based Environments in the subunit for Distance and Online Education. I’ll be sharing copies of my Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric (Copyright 2015 by Rogers & Van Haneghan).

I’ve shared our research paper on the AERA online Repository.  Read this blog page to learn more about our study. My hope is that it will be replicated to validate the rubric and improve not only instructors’ syllabi but teaching and learning in distance education. Let me know if you’re interested in replicating our study.

Are you going to AERA? Let’s connect in Toronto!

Sandra Annette Rogers, PhD

Teacherrogers Products
Pre-K, Kindergarten, First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Staff, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com

Join me at the Emerald Coast TESOL conference in Pensacola

A highway with road signs with the words Emerald Coast TESOL 2019>Exploring Paths to Literacy Proficiency

I serve as the professional development officer for the Emerald Coast Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ECTESOL), which is a chapter of the Sunshine State TESOL of Florida. Our local conference for the Gulf Coast area will be held in Pensacola on February 9th from 9:30-3:00. It will take place at the International Center, Building 71, at the  University of West Florida (UWF). Registration costs $25 and includes lunch. The theme is Exploring Paths to Literacy Proficiency. See the itinerary below.

9:30 – 10:00 Registration (and refreshments)

10:00 – 10:10 Welcome General Session: Ms. Rachel Hendrix, Executive Director, International Affairs, UWF;
Overview of Conference: Dr. Arlene Costello, President, ECTESOL

10:15 – 10:55 Keynote Speaker: Ms. Ginger Alberto, Program Director, Student Achievement through Language Acquisition, Florida Department of Education, Topic: Meeting the Needs of English Learners in Literacy Proficiency

11:00 – 11:30 Concurrent Sessions
Room 1: Engaging English Learners, Dr. Arlene Costello
Room 2: The Pragmatics of EFL/ESOL, Dr. Laureen Fregeau, University of South Alabama

11:35 – 12:00 Lunch & 12:00 – 12:15 Cultural Performances & DOOR PRIZES

12:20 – 1:00 General Session
Featured Presentation: Dr. John Pecore, Associate Professor, University of West Florida, Topic: Writing a winning TESOL grant proposal

1:05 – 1:35 Concurrent Sessions
Room 1: ESOL Professional Development & Career Opportunities, Dr. Sandra Rogers, Spring Hill College
Room 2: Room 2: Reaching for the Stars, Mrs. Milagros Sessions, Escambia County School District

1:40 – 2:15 Concurrent Sessions
Room 1: Language Writing Frames to Aid ESOL Elementary Students’ Research Projects, Dr. Sandra Rogers, SHC
Room 2: Supporting Non-Literate Adult Learners of English on Paths to Literacy, Dr. Meg Smith, SHC

2:20 – 2:50 Special Presentation General Session
The Dynamics of Literacy: Language and Science Dr. Vanessa Mangual, Bi-literacy Consultant, Benchmark Education

2:50 – 3:00 Business Meeting: Report by President; Paper Report by Treasurer; Ms. Vicki Murphy, ECTESOL Conference Chair, DOOR PRIZES

3:00 – 3:20 ECTESOL Board Meeting, Conference Room

Please register by January 29, 2019. You may bring your payment onsite on the day of the conference. Visit the ECTESOL website to download the registration form and learn more about our organization. Contact Dr. Arlene Costello at aces103@cox.net for more information. We hope to see you there!