Recipe for Digital Curation of Your Online Persona

Cartoon headshot of blogger, Sandra Rogers

Have you googled yourself lately? What does the Internet search reveal about you? With each hashtag, blog post, tweet, and online project at a time, you’re building your online reputation whether you want to or not. In the absence of professional branding, your online persona brands you. Curation of our online personal data is more important than ever. This is because our online information and interactions are being used to analyze us for commercial benefit, credit ratings, job selection, relationships, health care decisions, harassment, law enforcement, and machine learning (Matsakis, 2019).

I’m putting together a few basic curation tasks in the ‘recipe’ below for a class lesson. Curation, of course, will take ongoing effort. These are simple actions to get you started.

Tag words from my blog

RECIPE

Curating Your Online Persona 

Time: Ready in minutes based on diversity of digital tools used and length of your digital footprint
Serves: Average technology users
Calories: 0

TIPS

  • Log out of all accounts to fully see information that you publicly shared.
  • Use alphanumericsymbolic passphrases for strong login credentials (e.g., @T!mBuk2B42Long). Create different ones for different types of accounts.
  • Consider the long-term impact of posting or otherwise reacting online.
  • Subscribe to a technical news service that shares how to keep your data safe such as  Mashable, TechCrunch or Wired.

INGREDIENTS

Benevolent Intention
Critical Thinking
Persistence
Relevant Safeguards

PREPARATION

  1. Search for your name on different Internet browsers (e.g., Google Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari). View at least the first three pages of results to find older accounts that you may have forgotten about and should close.
  2. Use Google’s reverse image search tool to see if your shared photos (e.g., headshot, Facebook profile, or wedding pictures) are used elsewhere without permission. For example, did you know that FB profile photos are publicly available? Anyone could be reusing or repurposing them.
  3. Set short and long-term goals based on your findings and personal insight.

CURATION

  1. Set up a Google Alert on your name to stay informed of its mentions on the Internet.
  2. Cleanse unprofessional social media posts. For example, use GoCardigan to remove retweets and likes on Twitter. Why? Twitter users can delete their own tweets but not their reactions to others.
  3. Close compromised or unused online accounts to safeguard your data and reduce your digital footprint. Review Wikipedia’s list of data breaches. Recheck the list periodically.
  4. Tighten the privacy settings on your social media accounts.

Please share your techniques and issues in safeguarding your online persona. I’ll continue to add to this post as I dive deeper into this topic and as new technologies surface.


Recommended Readings

Bates, C. (2018). Take charge of your online reputation. Educause. Retrieved from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/10/take-charge-of-your-online-reputation

Internet safety and cyber security awareness for college students. (N.D.) Retrieved from https://www.cyberdegrees.org/resources/internet-safety-for-college-students/

Matsakis, L. (2019). The Wired guide to personal data collection. Condé Nast. Retrieved from https://www.wired.com/story/wired-guide-personal-data-collection/


Sandra Annette Rogers, Ph.D

Teacherrogers Products
Pre-K, Kindergarten, First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Staff, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com

Personal Branding for the 21st Century Educator

This is Sandra Rogers
Sandra Rogers is Teacherrogers

Have you googled yourself lately?  What does the Internet search reveal about you? As a 21st century educator, I’m building my online reputation with one search engine optimization (SEO) keyword, blog post, tweet, or project at a time. In fact, I’ve been wanting to blog about personal branding for some time because blog posts achieve higher SEO status than static websites.

Personal branding is something that most HR leaders profess as essential in today’s job market.  With the plethora of free and simple Web 2.0 tools, it’s fairly easy to create your own online brand.  Since my name is common, I decided to start building my own personal brand—Teacherrogers.  In fact, if you google my moniker,  teacherrogers, you’ll find all of my online projects and activities.

Personal branding for a 21st-century educator means showing your work online, posting your teaching philosophy, tweeting resources, and engaging in some type of “open” learning/teaching environments. Open environments online refer to free training, collaboration, or free information.  I’ve been involved with many open environments as an e-mentor.  My e-portfolio hosted on WordPress is my attempt to share my work online with potential employers, students, and my professional peers.  I personally believe sharing my teaching philosophy with others challenges me to revisit my long-held ideas about teaching.  In fact, it’s a work-in-progress on my to-do-list now, instead of somewhere in the back of my mind.

Are you on the shore or riding the wave when it comes to personal branding? Perhaps you joined several online learning communities and then never went back to complete your profile or never really got involved.  All these attempts will remain online forever plotting your digital pathway, so make sure you cull your online image periodically.  Set up Google Alerts on your name or any other phrase that is important to you; these alerts are sent to your Gmail account immediately after something is posted online about your topic/name. Let me know if you need any help.  My About Me page has my contact information.

Best Wishes,

Sandra Annette Rogers